Cheyenna Weber of SolidarityNYC on Occupying Workplace Democracy

Dru Oja Jay of the Media Co-op interviews Cheyenna Weber of SolidarityNYC on organizing, Occupy, and emergent worker cooperatives in New York City.    Part one: Cooperating to...

Dru Oja Jay of the Media Co-op interviews Cheyenna Weber of SolidarityNYC on organizing, Occupy, and emergent worker cooperatives in New York City. 

 

 

You spoke of emerging co-ops. What kinds of ideas are being attempted? Can you talk a little more about the lessons coming out of these efforts?

 

The emerging co-ops include a copy shop, a screenprinting business, a tech support firm, and a worker-owned restaurant. Most of them are directly related to operations that were put into place during the occupation of Zuccotti Park last fall. OccuCopy provides flyers, stickers, buttons, and posters to working groups within Occupy Wall Street in addition to outside orders. The screenprinting co-op is emerging from a guild of dedicated volunteers who produced t-shirts and posters at large mobilizations and on site at the park for anyone who wanted on a donation basis. The tech support firm is emerging from the work of several talented web developers who have been behind the many websites and applications we’ve used at OWS. The worker-owner restaurant folks also want to develop a community supported kitchen as part of their model, and they’re all folks who were involved in the OWS Kitchen that at one point fed more people each day than any of the largest soup kitchens in NYC. All of them have representatives who meet regularly to discuss our projects and our shared vision for co-op development in our city.

 

A few of the lessons learned have been specific to OWS and our relationship to General Assembly, which I won’t go into, but suffice to say we learned pretty early that not every self-identified radical supports co-ops as anti-capitalist economic development. I think that came as a bit of a shock and made us aware that there is a lot of misunderstandings about how co-ops work and what their role has been in social movements. We also all felt somewhat uneasy about incorporation–should we be nonprofits, LLCs, co-ops under NY state law, B corporations, etc.? What we learned from the wonderful folks at the Urban Justice Center is that incorporation doesn’t really matter that much, actually, and it’s really about how you write your by-laws and structure your practices that matters.

 

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