Film tells story of the smallest chocolate factory in the world

A new film telling the story of an anarchist chocolatier fighting against large-scale globalisation through co-operation, has been lauded by critics.

A new film telling the story of an anarchist chocolatier fighting against large-scale globalisation through co-operation, has been lauded by critics.

Nothing Like Chocolate’ follows Mott Green, founder of the Grenada Chocolate Company Cooperative, and Nelice Stewart, an independent cocoa farmer, as they try to compete in a world overrun by unethical trading policies and in some cases child slavery.

Mott’s goal is to create the best chocolate in the world, ethically and taste-wise. The Grenada Chocolate Company Cooperative is a worker co-operative based on the Caribbean island of Grenada and has become known as the world’s smallest chocolate factory.

The director Kum-Kum Bhavnani explained: “Farmers receive a low price for their beans. In order to live even at subsistence level, they have to draw on a large pool of labour, which includes children who can be trafficked for this work.”

“In telling stories about people who are doing the right thing, we see how social injustices can be challenged. The stories of Mott Green and Nelice Stewart show that it is possible to make chocolate in a highly ethical way. Their honesty, determination and compassion captured my imagination, and my hope is that others will also admire and be inspired by Nelice and Mott.”

The Grenada Chocolate Co-operative draws on solar power, employee shareholding and small-scale antique equipment to make delicious, organic, and socially conscious chocolate.

The film even has a celebrity involved, with Susan Sarandon, who provides the narration. Kum-Kum worked with Susan on her previous film, the Shape of Water, which won several awards.

Nothing Like Chocolate has also had several awards and nominations at over six film festivals all over the world including Best Documentary at the ITN Film Festival in Los Angeles, Best of the Fest at the Santa Barbara International Film Festival and nominated for Best Documentary ay the Milan International Festival.

Kum-Kum is a university professor of Sociology at the University of California, Santa Barbara who teaches about the third world.

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