Musings on how to be Whole(brained)

Our HR Forum has been having a discussion on left and right brains. Though originally asking for ideas on how to develop a structure that works well for...

Our HR Forum has been having a discussion on left and right brains. Though originally asking for ideas on how to develop a structure that works well for an organization (and for right-brained folks who find themselves adrift in a left-brained world), the conversation has evolved.

 Lisa Totaro wrote, “While I don’t know of any unusual org structures that work well, it seems like teams with both righties and lefties (brains, not hands) work the best (creative director vs. business leader). It also seems like though right-brains may be less respected in our society, they have just as much – if not more – potential because they can see big picture more easily.”(She also shared an interesting powerpoint.)

Brent Dixon mentioned that he recently spent a week at a program called Innovation Engineering that was focusing “on idea generation techniques designed for whole-brained teams. Whole brained teams, groups with the right and left brains equally represented, get more done because they balance each other out.”

Matt Monge chimed in and redirected the focus, “Maybe we can reframe the discussion slightly and arrive at some alternate understandings. For example, what if we looked at it not so much as how the organization is necessarily structured (though that’s certainly an important part of this), but rather on how individuals and groups have learned to operate within a given structure? It may not be the structure itself that is the cause of the inability for righties and lefties to work well and compatibly together, but instead how we, as humans, departments, and organizations, have programmed ourselves to work within said structure.”

What do you think?

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