Back to Basics: Worker Cooperatives as Economic Development

"Drawing upon the literature on anchor institutions and on Ann Markusen’s (2007) analysis of the “Consumption Base” theory of development, I look at the assets deployed in the...

“Drawing upon the literature on anchor institutions and on Ann Markusen’s (2007) analysis of the “Consumption Base” theory of development, I look at the assets deployed in the “Cleveland Model.” From the network of small and medium cooperative businesses that already exist in the United States, there is sufficient evidence to indicate that worker cooperatives can assist in the stabilization of communities by offering living wages as well as a chance to build wealth in the form of workplace equity. In so doing, they have the potential to turn the “non-basic” sectors that export-base models for growth ignore—such as home repair, nursing care, local fresh food supply, and cleaning services—into jobs that can grow wealth and expand the workforce to marginalized populations such as the underemployed, women, and the formerly incarcerated.”

A short paper from Evan Casper-Futterman, Masters Student at the University of New Orleans.

In this article


Join the Conversation