Housing co-op teams up with Glasgow council on £5m renovation project

Council officers in Glasgow are working with Rosehill Housing Co-operative to deliver a £5.12million improvement programme to 200 homes in the city’s Priesthill area. Residents and councillors had...

Council officers in Glasgow are working with Rosehill Housing Co-operative to deliver a £5.12million improvement programme to 200 homes in the city’s Priesthill area.

Residents and councillors had complained about the condition of the homes, built in the inter-war years as council stock, with many properties in disrepair and 25 lying vacant.

There have also been reports of anti-social behaviour, flytipping, vandalism and arson attacks in the area, which was refurbished and sold off in the 1980s. In 2015, residents told the local press the neighbourhood was “a death trap”.

A disproportionately high proportion of homes are privately let, says the council, and there have been reports of bad practice by some landlords.

The housing co-op has worked with council officers to speak to residents to deal with the issues, and a three-stage action plan has been drawn up.

Related: Co-ops respond to government white paper on housing crisis

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Phase one will see external wall insulation installed and repairs to roofs, gutters, pipes, doors and windows.

Phase two will upgrade security, including door entry systems and improved lighting.

And phase three will improve the environment, with work on gardens, common areas, refuse collection areas and external lighting.

It is expected that Rosehill, which has beenwe have been refurbishing, building and managing houses for rent since 1987, will become factor for the properties.

Glasgow City Council leader Frank McAveety said: “We are determined to tackle the issues that have been arising in this part of Priesthill, and will work with local residents and our partners to transform the condition of these homes.

“This investment will enable a high standard of property management, maintenance and security for the people living here.”

The £5.12m funding for the first two phases of this work, which will last until 2018, comes from Glasgow City Council; the Scottish Government, owners, the social landlord, and utility firm EON.

The council will consult with the owners on a third phase –  including considering proposals for the water pump building – in the coming months.

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