Labour loses ground in Wales – but Co-op numbers increase

The Labour Party is set to retain power in Wales, despite a surprise loss – but has seen an increase in the number of Labour / Co-operative assembly members...

The Labour Party is set to retain power in Wales, despite a surprise loss – but has seen an increase in the number of Labour / Co-operative assembly members (AMs).

In a night that saw Ukip win its first seats in the assembly, Plaid Cymru leader Leanne Wood took the Rhondda seat from Labour’s Leighton Andrews. Labour has won 29 seats, but has not reached the 31-seat majority.

There are now 11 Labour / Co-operative AMs, up from the previous nine.

In the assembly elections, each voter has two votes: the first is for a candidate to become the AM for the voter’s constituency, elected by the first past the post system; the second is for a regional closed party list of candidates. In total, 60 individuals are elected for five-year terms – 40 AMs represent the geographical constituencies and 20 represent five electoral regions using proportional representation.

All seven Labour / Co-operative candidates standing for re-election retained their seats:

  • Mick Antoniw, Pontypridd
  • Alun Davies, Blaenau Gwent
  • Ann Jones, Vale of Clwyd
  • Lynne Neagle, Torfaen
  • Rebecca Evans, Gower
  • Vaughan Gething, Cardiff South & Penarth
  • John Griffiths, Newport East

Of the nine new candidates contesting seats, four won seats Huw Irranca-Davies, Ogmorel; Jeremy Miles, Neath; Rhianon Passmore, Islwyn; and Lee Waters, Llanelli. Julia Dobson lost Ynys Môn (Anglesey) to Plaid Cymru.

Mary Wimbury (North Wales), Ceri Reeves (South Wales West), Anna McMorrin (South Wales Central) and Deborah Wilcox (South Wales East) didn’t make the regional lists

In the run up to the elections, the Co-operative Party launched a manifesto for Wales, which proposed co-operative development in a number of areas, including energy, transport, housing, credit unions, health, sport and crime prevention.

“A fairer society means people and organisations sharing power and working together. We believe that things work best when everyone has a voice and when services are accountable to the people who use them,” wrote Alun Michael, the former Labour/Co-op MP for Cardiff South and Penarth, in his forward.

“At a time when so many things about which we care are under threat, it is imperative for all departments of Welsh Government and every agency and organisation in Wales to work together in the interests of the people of Wales.”

Full Results:

  • Labour: 29 seats (-1)
  • (Of which Labour / Co-operative: 11 seats)
  • Conservative: 11 seats (-3)
  • Plaid Cymru: 12 seats (+1)
  • Liberal Democrats: 1 seat (-4)
  • Ukip: 7 seats (+7)
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